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Hannah Beckerman Reveals New Book Called If Only I Could Tell You

If Only I Could Tell YouHannah Beckerman has revealed the cover to her second book called ‘If Only I Could Tell You’.

What the back cover says –

Audrey’s family has fallen apart. Her two grown-up daughters, Jess and Lily, are estranged, and her two teenage granddaughters have never been allowed to meet. A secret that echoes back thirty years has splintered the family in two, but is also the one thing keeping them connected.

As tensions reach breaking point, the irrevocable choice that one of them made all those years ago is about to surface. After years of secrets and silence, how can one broken family find their way back to each other?

With a stunning cover and a heartbreaking synopsis, this book is guaranteed to be a tearjerker!

You can pre-order If Only I Could Tell You from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 21st February 2019.

What feminism Means to Me

The Same For Everyone

On the book tour for Deborah Frances-White’s brand new book called ‘The Guilty Feminist’, I talk about what feminism means to me.The Guilty Feminist

For me, feminism is all about equality and respect. It’s not about burning bras or shouting it from the rooftops, but to have equal consideration for everyone and their abilities. It’s about being called Bronagh and not love or pet, it’s about being paid the same as male colleagues if we’re producing the same workload and it’s about not being considered as having ideas above my station purely because I want to strive forward and better my career.

As a feminist, I want my voice to be heard, to be considered as an equal and to recognised for being me and and not just purely on my gender.

You can buy The Guilty Feminist from Amazon and is available to buy from good bookshops.

Book News – The Mother Of All Christmases By Milly Johnson

The Mother Of All ChristmasesI’m delighted to see that Milly Johnson is back in 2018 with a delicious new Christmas book called ‘The Mother Of All Christmases’ and it’s a lovely return to some of her old characters from ‘A Winter Flame’.

What the back cover says –

Eve Glace – co-owner of the theme park Winterworld – is having a baby and her due date is a perfectly timed 25th December. And she’s decided that she and her husband Jacques should renew their wedding vows with all the pomp that was missing the first time. But growing problems at Winterworld keep distracting them …

Annie Pandoro and her husband Joe own a small Christmas cracker factory, are well set up and happy together despite life never blessing them with a much-wanted child. But when Annie finds that the changes happening to her body aren’t typical of the menopause but pregnancy, her joy is uncontainable.

Palma Collins has agreed to act as a surrogate, hoping the money will get her out of the gutter in which she finds herself. But when the couple she is helping split up, is she going to be left carrying a baby she never intended to keep?

Annie, Palma and Eve all meet at the ‘Christmas Pudding Club’, a new directive started by a forward-thinking young doctor to help mums-to-be mingle and share their pregnancy journeys. Will this group help each other to find love, contentment and peace as Christmas approaches?

The brand new novel from the Sunday Times bestselling author of The Perfectly Imperfect Woman; a gorgeous read full of love, life, laughter – and crackers!

You can pre-order The Mother of All Christmases from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 15th November 2018.

My inspiration for Meadowbrook Manor- Faith Bleasdale

Faith BleasdaleOn the book tour for her new book called ‘Secrets At Meadowbrook Manor’, author of the book Faith Bleasdale talks about her inspiration behind the book.

I have loved being able to write about Meadowbrook Manor and the Singer siblings’ as a series and with book two – ‘Secrets At Meadowbrook Manor’ coming out, I know that when I eventually finish the series I’ll miss them. I wonder if I can keep writing about them forever?

When I was thinking about the first Meadowbrook book, my starting point was the house – Meadowbrook Manor. I wanted it to be a character in its own right and I hope I’ve achieved this. I was aiming for it to be a house that had a soul, and a heart, and from that point I then came up with the story of the Singer Siblings, and the animal sanctuary.

I didn’t want to write about a house that was crumbling or needing saving, I wanted the people, and animals to need saving and for the house to be pivotal in achieving this.

As an adult with only one sibling, I still found the idea of having to live with said sibling as an adult interesting – or horrifying actually. I’m not sure if I had to live with my brother for a year now we would both survive but I loved the idea that sibling relationships change so much over the years and wanted to explore the concept of how those who had lived together as children would cope living together as adults.

I also wanted the animal sanctuary to be a huge feature and I think I can safely say it plays a central role in all the stories set at Meadowbrook. I am a huge fan of animals and I wanted a positive environment where animals are loved, cared for, wanted and also they also play a central role in helping people. Which, I fully believe animals do. Even if you’re not an animal person surely you can’t help but be moved by Hilda the English Sheepdog who, like many people, is looking for love. Or Elton and David the gay bulls who clearly love each other… Crazy, maybe but I think that it’s important to give them centre stage at times, as we can learn a lot from animals.

Secrets At Meadowbrook Manor

Another thing I am passionate about is community. I grew up in the country, in a village, and yes there were morris dancers. Now though it feels different and I love how Meadowbrook Manor brings the community together, helps people, fends off loneliness and teaches kindness. Is is unrealistic in this day and age? Maybe but it shouldn’t be.

I don’t believe Meadowbrook Manor is a perfect world because that doesn’t exist but I hope I have created a place where my lovely readers and future readers want to visit, want to stay, and want to live in. Because I know that’s exactly how I feel about it. I’d even be happy to muck out the pigs… Maybe!

You can buy Secrets at Meadowbrook Manor from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 20th September 2018.

Locations in 11 Missed Calls By Elisabeth Carpenter

11 Missed CallsOn the book tour for her second book called ’11 Missed Calls’, Elisabeth Carpenter talks about the different locations in her book.

My second novel, ’11 Missed Calls’, is predominantly set in Lancashire: Preston, Lytham and St Annes (they are two separate places, with two others in between).

Both families, past and present, live in Preston. I haven’t specified an area in which they live, but have described their terraced houses. These tend to be nearer the city itself, as opposed to the surrounding towns with larger houses. I live in Preston myself, and used to live close to the city in a two-up two-down, like the characters in the novel. The walls were pretty thin (which could be rather awkward at times …) but I used this to add to the claustrophobia and paranoia of one of my characters, Debbie. As her mental health declines, she feels she’s constantly being watched. Being able to hear her neighbours either side added to this.

Debbie’s chapters are mainly based in the home, where the familiar starts to feel strange. Her daughter, Anna, in the present day, however, works in a charity bookshop in St Annes. I used to work in St Annes managing a charity shop, so I didn’t have to look far for inspiration. The volunteers came from variety of backgrounds, which you probably wouldn’t find in traditional workplaces – and were of different ages. One of the volunteers in the book is based on a woman I worked with, but I won’t say who (though, if you know me – you’ll probably know who it is!).

Towards the end of the book, the family in 1986 holiday in Tenerife. I haven’t been to Tenerife since I was seventeen when I went with my friend. We weren’t very streetwise, so God knows how we managed to persuade our parents to let us go alone. Like Debbie in 11 Missed Calls, we were nearly choking with the cigarette smoke on the plane, even though we smoked ourselves (sorry, Mum).

We lived on bread and Heinz macaroni cheese (opened with a ‘stabby’ tin opener) during the day, and cheese and tomato pizza at night at the same restaurant (until we found a McDonalds). We enjoyed the fact we didn’t need (fake) ID to drink too vodka, as the legal drinking age was 16 then. We spent the first day two hours ahead of everyone else, not knowing it’s the same time in Tenerife as it is in England. How we survived, I don’t know.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to go back to Tenerife to research the novel, so spent many hours on Google maps. It’s quite gruesome, but I had to find a cliff accessible enough and high enough for someone to be able to contemplate their life (yes, that’s a euphemism). Originally it was going to be a bridge, but there wasn’t one high enough, so I had to invent somewhere, which I felt more comfortable with, if that’s the right word.

It’s always tricky describing places I’ve never been, as there’s a tendency to overshare new knowledge. But I hope that in writing about places I’m familiar with, or have visited, has added to the atmosphere and authenticity of the book.

You can buy 11 Missed Calls from Amazon and is available to buy from good bookshops.