Skip to content

Trisha Ashley Writers Tips

“TrishaTrisha Ashley shares her writing tips with budding writers.

Read very widely, but especially current bestsellers in the genre you’re writing for. Ask yourself what their novels are giving the reader that yours doesn’t.

Trisha Ashley

“TrishaTrisha Ashley’s ‘Sunday Times’ bestselling novels have twice been shortlisted for the Melissa Nathan Award for Comedy Romance, and ‘Every Woman for Herself’ was nominated by readers as one of the top three romantic novels of the last fifty years.’The House Of Hopes And Dreams’ is her latest book.

  1. To readers of the blog who may not be familiar with you or your writing, can you tell us a bit about yourself and how you got into writing.
    From being a little girl I knew I wanted to be a writer and painter and by my late teens had moved on from poetry, little plays and short stories to writing novels…very bad novels.

    Since I thought that all you needed to do to be a novelist was live your life, read a lot and keep writing (true), I went off to Art College to study fine art – but quickly transferred to the architectural glass department instead. Like Angel, the heroine of ‘The House of Hopes and Dreams’, painting with light added another dimension.

    I kept writing and sending off my novels over the next few years, settling down to write dark domestic satire. After many rejections (some of them including very helpful and encouraging advice), and various ups and downs, I was introduced to my agent, Judith Murdoch, who persuaded me to run a strand of romantic comedy through my novels – which I did. The first to be published was ‘Good Husband Material’ and I haven’t looked back since.

  2. Can you tell us about your new book ‘The House of Hopes and Dreams’
    Carey and Angel have been best friends since childhood, so when Carey inherits a run-down Arts and Crafts house and Angel loses her long term partner and her happy, productive life in his stained glass studio, it seems meant to be that she and Carey should move into Mossby together and turn the old house into a home.

    Of course, the house does have a tragic past and more than one mystery to solve…

  3. If you were to start your own book club, what authors would you ask to join?
    I can’t imagine starting a book club, where you all decide on one book to read and discuss – these days, if the writing hasn’t grabbed me by chapter three then, to quote Douglas Adams, it’s ‘Goodbye, and thanks for all the fish.’ Life’s to short to waste trudging through stuff you find dreary, pretentious, bleakly sordid, or just plain boring, even if it’s been hyped to the skies, garlanded with bay leaves and won some prestigious literary award.

    I do like a really challenging read from time to time – but it needs to be good writing and well worth the journey.

  4. What’s your favourite part of the writing process?
    Pressing the ‘send’ button and seeing it vanish into the ether, while the ideas for the next novel sneak in by the back door and stand shuffling their feet, like guests who’ve arrived way too early for the party.
  5. What’s your favourite opening line from a book?
    “All this happened, more or less…”. ‘From Slaughterhouse 5’ by Kurt Vonnegut.
  6. Who’s your favourite literary hero or heroine?
    Probably the indomitable Victorian archaeologist Amelia Peabody, heroine of Elizabeth Peter’s novels set in Egypt.
  7. If you were starting your writing journey again, would you do anything differently?
    I don’t think so: it was a long, tough journey, but being forged in the fire makes you stronger. And everything, good or bad, that has happened in my life has been composted down and used to grow something else, so nothing has been wasted.
  8. The House Of Hopes And Dreams

  9. If you were stranded on a desert island, which three books would you bring with you to pass the time?
    ‘The Hawk in the Rain’ by Ted Hughes, ‘Naked Once More’ by Elizabeth Peters… and maybe ‘Smoke Signalling for Dummies’.
  10. From books to films, what’s been your favourite adaptation?
    More of a gloriously cheesy Bollywood reinterpretation than an adaptation, I adore ‘Bride and Prejudice’, it always lifts my spirits.
  11. What area do you suggest a budding writer should concentrate on to further their abilities?
    Read very widely, but especially current bestsellers in the genre you’re writing for. Ask yourself what their novels are giving the reader that yours doesn’t.
  12. When sitting down to write, what is the one item you need beside you?
    A good cup of coffee.
  13. And finally do you have any projects or releases on the horizon which you would like to share with the readers of the website?
    I am at work on a new novel…but I never like to talk about the next book until I’ve written at least the first draft, because otherwise the magic just flies right out of it.
    Follow Trisha Ashley on Twitter Trisha Ashley for updates.

    You can buy the The House of Hopes and Dreams from Amazon and is available to buy from good bookshops.

The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found By Trisha Ashley

The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found‘The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found’ is the latest book by Trisha Ashley.

Alice Rose is a foundling, discovered on the Yorkshire moors above Haworth as a baby. Adopted but then later rejected again by a horrid step-mother, Alice struggles to find a place where she belongs. Only baking – the scent of cinnamon and citrus and the feel of butter and flour between her fingers – brings a comforting sense of home. So it seems natural that when she finally decides to return to Haworth, Alice turns to baking again, taking over a run-down little teashop and working to set up an afternoon tea emporium. Luckily she soon makes friends – including a Grecian god-like neighbour – who help her both set up home and try to solve the mystery of who she is. There are one or two last twists in the dark fairytale of Alice’s life to come . . . but can she find her happily ever after?

Trisha is back with a new romantic and whimsical tale, perfect for fans of ‘Wuthering Heights’ set against the backdrop of the blustery moors, this poignant tale is just the right mixture of romance and humour to make this a captivating story.

The story is primarily is seen through the narrative of Alice Rose, a tender hearted woman who retreats to the small village of Haworth, when she purchases a teashop on a whim, after the sudden death of her fiancee, who was killed in a cliff climbing accident. Haworth, holds a lot of old memories for Alice, it was her birth place, where her mother left her wrapped up in a sheepskin rug, only to be discovered by a local farmer. Alice, never knew her real parents and always wondered where she came from, she has many unanswered questions and hopes that setting up not only shop and home, that they will finally be answered. As, she goes about making the teashop, the best in the village, Alice is kindly helped by Nile, the local antique dealer, a handsome rogue of a man, that women flourish to including Alice, who is also reluctantly drawn to. Nile and his warm family, embrace Alice, like a long lost sister, offering her the comfort of a family bosom that she missed out on.

When she’s not setting up her teashop, Alice is busy writing her alternative fairy tales and throughout the story, there is little extracts from the tales and these make for entertaining reading and a nice distraction from the main plot line of the story. Another interesting addition in the story, is the inclusion of the perspective of Alice’s birth mother and how she ended up leaving Alice on the moors, and it is quite wonderful how cleverly the stories all weave together, coming to an joint conclusion in the end.

With a collection of vibrant and quick witted characters, there was rarely a dull moment in the story, with Alice’s sweet nature, her new friends, Nile, his sister, Bel and their mother Shelia, their scenes together make for poignant and sweet reading as Alice adjusts to her new life.

A coming of age novel, about setting up and finding your place in life, ‘The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found’, is a warm and enjoyable tale with a sweet narrative that is the perfect escapism read, filled with fancy buns, handsome men and a creative leading lady, this book is a comforting read that is ideal to curl up with.

You can pre-order The Little Teashop of Lost and Found from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 29th June 2017.

Book News – The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found By Trisha Ashley

The Little Teashop Of Lost And FoundWell loved, author Trisha Ashley is back with a new book in 2017 called ‘The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found’ and it’s got the most incredibly sweet cover.

The story of ‘The Little Teashop Of Lost And Found’ is –

Alice Rose is a foundling, discovered on the Yorkshire moors above Haworth as a baby. Adopted but then later rejected again by a horrid step-mother, Alice struggles to find a place where she belongs. Only baking – the scent of cinnamon and citrus and the feel of butter and flour between her fingers – brings a comforting sense of home.

So it seems natural that when she finally decides to return to Haworth, Alice turns to baking again, taking over a run-down little teashop and working to set up an afternoon tea emporium.

Luckily she soon makes friends – including a Grecian god-like neighbour – who help her both set up home and try to solve the mystery of who she is. There are one or two last twists in the dark fairytale of Alice’s life to come . . . but can she find her happily ever after?

Wonderfully wry, heart-warming and life-affirming, Trisha Ashley’s hilarious novel is perfect for fans of romantic comedies by Milly Johnson and Jill Mansell. And it contains recipes!

You can pre-order The Little Teashop of Lost and Found from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 1st June 2017.

Trisha Ashley Book Tour

Trisha AshleyI’m delighted to be kicking off the book tour for ‘Sunday Times’ bestselling author Trisha Ashley’s brand new Christmas book, ‘A Christmas Cracker’

Today on the first day of the tour, Trisha answers the question that we have all been wondering.

What inspired you to write A Christmas Cracker?
I was thinking about the way Victorian Quaker factory owners took a benevolent interest in their workers and also about their involvement in penal reform and prisoner rehabilitation. The character of Mercy Marwood, the elderly owner of Marwood’s Magical Crackers, was formed in that tradition and when she extends a helping hand to ex-con Tabby Coombs, it is in the hope that Tabby’s artistic input will help save the ailing business. A Christmas Cracker[/amazon_link]And Tabby herself, who was wrongly convicted of fraud, is a very positive person who throws herself enthusiastically into doing just that and doesn’t let bitterness and anger cloud her judgement when a fresh new future beckons.

You can pre-order A Christmas Cracker from Amazon and will available to buy from good bookshops from 22nd October 2015.

If you enjoyed today’s stop on the tour, then check out the poster below and follow the tour.

Trisha Ashley Book Tour