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You, Me, Everything By Catherine Isaac

You, Me, Everything‘You, Me, Everything’ is Catherine Isaac’s debut novel.

Sick of her boyfriend Adam’s lying and cheating, Laura throws him out only months after giving birth to their son. While she brings up William with the help of her mum, Susan, Adam moves to France to follow his dreams. But ten years on, Susan is battling a debilitating disease, aged just 53, and she convinces her daughter that William needs his father in his life. So, in their first trip abroad in years, Laura and ten-year-old William set off to spend the summer at Chateau de Roussignol, in the sunlit hills of the Dordogne, where Adam now lives. Laura is determined is to make Adam fall in love with his own son. But the problem isn’t only that he’s an unwilling participant in this game. It’s that Laura is tormented by a secret of her own, one that nobody – especially William – must discover.

If you haven’t heard of Catherine Issac then I’m sure you’ve heard of her other writing name, Jane Costello. Jane has written nine novels, all filled with humour and charm that make for the perfect escapism read.

In her first book, writing as Catherine Issac, although there is the sharp injection of Jane’s humour, there is also a beautiful tenderness to this love story that made the book a struggle to put down.

In this story, we meet single mother Jess and her son, William who head off to France as Jess wants William to bond with his father. Even though, Adam broke Jess’s heart, she wants them to have a relationship and spend more time together despite the distance.

Jess isn’t entirely happy about this situation, but goes ahead with the plan, more so to keep her mother happy. Her mother, is terminally ill with Huntington’s disease, an illness that is rapidly taking over her body and one of her wishes, is that William has a relationship with his father.

The story is written in the first person and is seen solely through Jess’s narrative. She’s a kind hearted woman, who never really got over the heartbreak that Adam caused her and tries to hide her resentful feelings from William. Meanwhile, William is wildly curious about life and loves nothing more than sharing random facts. I loved the scenes with William and Jess, where they argued over ownership of the iPad and he battled with his occasionally embarrassing mother.

The main subject of the story is Jess’s mothers ongoing battle with Huntington’s Disease and regularly flashes back to when Jess was a teenager and her mother began to show symptoms of the illness. What’s terrifying to read is that in all the advancements in medicine and technology, there is no known cure for the illness and once contracted, the illness has a 50/50 chance of being passed onto a child. Catherine has thoroughly researched the illness and provides background information for those who have never heard of it.

To say that this story is beautifully written would be an understatement and it’s no surprise that it’s already being adapted for film.

It’s gentle, flows at a lovely pace and for every tearjerking moment, there’s a gentle joke to lighten the mood.

A story that stays with you long after you reached the final page, ‘You, Me, Everything’ is an enchanting tale about love, new beginnings and most importantly, hope.

You can pre-order You Me Everything from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 20th September 2018.

Book News – You, Me, Everything By Catherine Isaac

You, Me, EverythingCatherine Isaac has revealed the cover to her debut novel called ‘You, Me, Everything’ which excitedly is being adapted for film, even though it won’t be out until 2018.

But for people not in the know, Catherine Isaac is actually Jane Costello, who already has nine books under her belt.

What the back cover says:

Sick of her boyfriend Adam’s lying and cheating, Laura throws him out only months after giving birth to their son. While she brings up William with the help of her mum, Susan, Adam moves to France to follow his dreams.

But ten years on, Susan is battling a debilitating disease, aged just 53, and she convinces her daughter that William needs his father in his life. So, in their first trip abroad in years, Laura and ten-year-old William set off to spend the summer at Chateau de Roussignol, in the sunlit hills of the Dordogne, where Adam now lives.

Laura is determined is to make Adam fall in love with his own son. But the problem isn’t only that he’s an unwilling participant in this game. It’s that Laura is tormented by a secret of her own, one that nobody – especially William – must discover.

With a beautiful cover and a heartbreaking synopsis, ‘You, Me, Everything’ sounds like a stunning story.

You can pre-order You Me Everything from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 20th September 2018.

The Day I Lost You Book Tour – Interview With Fionnuala Kearney

Fionnuala KearneyFionnuala Kearney pronounced Finoola, lives in Ascot with her husband. They have two grown-up daughters. One of seven children, ‘The Day I Lost You’ is her second novel with Harper Collins.

  1. Can you tell us what your new book ‘The Day I Lost You’ is about?
    The book tells the story of Jess, a forty eight year old woman, whose only child, twenty five year old, Anna, has been reported missing in an avalanche. Jess is devastated, and while immersed in grief, is left looking after Anna’s five year old daughter Rose. As secrets and lies unfold and Jess discovers a world of suspicion and hurt left by Anna, she’s forced to question whether she ever knew the person she loved most in the world. It looks under the skin of a mother and daughter relationship, and explores love (in all its guises) and loss, but ultimately – hope.
  2. Where do you get your ideas for your stories?
    Everywhere! Listening in on a conversation on the tube, reading an article in a newspaper, hearing something on the radio… Or sometimes, I come up with a character whom I love and ask loads of ‘What if?’ questions about them.
  3. Was there ever a book that you read, that didn’t live up to the hype that surrounded it and left you disappointed?
    Ooh! If there was, I’m too much a lady to say! Seriously, I admire anyone, and I mean anyone, who has a novel published today, so I’d hate to single out someone and say I was disappointed. That said, reading enjoyment is such a subjective thing. Also, I rarely read a hyped up book during the hype, preferring to keep it until after the fuss dies down!
  4. I always thought the opening lines to “The Lovely Bones” was quite memorable, are there any opening lines to books that stuck out to you?
    Since I love writing family drama, one of my favourites has to be ‘Anna Karenina’:
    “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Another favourite (Hell, I love every line she writes) is the beginning of Maggie O’Farrell’s ‘The Hand That First Held Mine’ for its immediate sense of atmosphere.
  5. The Day I Lost You

  6. What’s been your favourite book of 2016?
    It’s hard to choose but if you’re making me?! So far, probably ‘Olive Kitteridge’ by Elizabeth Strout which just has the most brilliant characterisation…
  7. What part of the writing process do you most enjoy?
    I love writing the first and second drafts – where the writing is free and I can bash out my story and characters without worrying about it too much. The subsequent drafts, where I have to cut and cull and enhance and zone in on the detail of the plot and the story, I find more of a challenge!
  8. How would you describe your writing?
    Gosh, that’s a hard one! I write family drama so I try hard to make sure my dialogue is authentic i.e how these people would really speak to one another. I don’t go in for long lengthy descriptive prose, preferring my characters to tell the story. As a result, I think most of my books are pretty dialogue heavy. I try also to tune into the senses – what’s going on in the background? Are there any sounds – is that a siren that just went by? Is that the outline of a sleigh I can see in the dark? What’s that smell? And taste – as well as food and drink – fear, anxiety and desire can be tasted too.
  9. What is your favourite book and why?
    I have two – completely different – so please don’t ask me to choose! The first is a classic – ‘Wuthering Heights’, by Emily Bronte, a beautiful tale of love, loss, revenge and obsession. Frankly, Heathcliff is probably singularly responsible for my writing tortured male parts!
    The second is a more recent novel, ‘One Day’, by David Nicholls. And yes, it too has a (more contemporary) complex male in the form of Dexter! It’s essentially a love story but its simple structure – where the two main characters Emma and Dex meet on the same day for the following twenty years is one I wish I’d thought of!

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You can buy The Day I Lost You from Amazon and is available to buy from good bookshops.

Fionnuala Kearney Reveals New Book – The Day I Lost You

The Day I Lost YouFionnuala Kearney is back with a new book in 2016 called ‘The Day I Lost You’

The story of ‘The Day I Lost You’ is –

The day that Jess’s daughter, Anna, is reported lost in an avalanche is the day that changes everything.

Left to explain her mother’s absence to Anna’s five year old daughter, Rose, Jess isn’t yet ready to admit to herself that her daughter might not be coming back. But Anna’s disappearance dredges up some life changing questions: Jess must uncover her daughter’s secret life – and unearth a secret that could change her world irrevocably.

The day I lost you was the day I discovered your secret life.

The day I lost you was the day you tore my family apart.

I really enjoyed Fionnuala’s debut novel,’You, Me And Other People’, so this is another book to look forward to in 2016.

You can pre-order The Day I Lost You from Amazon and will be available to buy from good bookshops from 16th June 2016.

Fionnuala Kearney

Fionnuala KearneyFionnuala Kearney pronounced Finoola, lives in Ascot with her husband. They have two grown-up daughters. One of seven children, Fionnuala likes to write about the nuances and subtle layers of human relationships, peeling them away to see what’s really going on beneath.’You, Me and Other People’ is her first novel.

  1. Can you tell us about your debut book ‘You, Me And Other People’
    It deals with love, betrayal, guilt, grief – some of those universal themes that we all battle with in normal daily life. Although it’s a story about a marriage in freefall and the ripple effects on Beth and Adam Hall’s family, it’s also about a lot more than that – like secrets and lies – is there ever a good reason to keep them or time to reveal them? It’s told from both parties’ points of view and it was a challenge to write; dealing with the topics and also writing from both the female and male perspective! (Though I have to confess I loved being in the head of an errant forty three year old man – who knew?!)
  2. To the readers of the website, tell us about yourself and how you got into writing.
    Well, I used to have a whole other life! I had, for a long time, a career in property as a home-search agent. Imagine Phil and Kirsty without the cameras – that was me. I loved my job for many years but eventually the itch to write just had to be scratched. I had only ever had time to ‘dabble’ whilst working and being a mother to two daughters, but I just yearned to be able to write… I was eventually lucky enough (because of a very supportive husband) to be able to consider giving up work and concentrate on writing and so began the long journey to publication. I wrote lyrics, poems, short stories and three other novels en-route. All of this was during the time that the internet enabled me to meet and learn from other writers.
  3. If you were starting your writing journey again, would you do anything differently?
    No. Every writer has their route, their own personal journey. Mine took a lot longer than I had originally hoped. A bit like starting a train ride, the train breaking down and having to change trains; that train going down the wrong track; you ending up somewhere you never planned; double back, start again! But despite the fact that it has taken a long time to get to this point, I wouldn’t change a thing. I truly believed I’ve learned something every step of the way.
  4. What book did you read that made you decide to become an author?
    I have always loved reading and used to devour anything by Maeve Binchy or Marian Keyes, but I don’t think I could single out one book. As a young child I loved Enid Blyton and I think the ability to lose myself, as an early reader, in a world so totally different to my own was a joy that has never left me. At some point along the way, I did start to think “I wonder if I could do this”, but when it came to trying it wasn’t one book alone that pushed me, just the love of reading and writing.
  5. Who is your favourite literary hero/heroine?
    Rebecca and the Bennett sisters were important heroines from my reading history but I do love to write about tortured men! So, my favourites are probably Heathcliff (Wuthering Heights) and Dexter (One Day)
  6. What authors do you admire?
    I love Marian Keyes, Anna McPartlin, Adele Parks, JoJo Moyes, David Nichols and Maggie O’Farrell. To be honest, they’re the ones I most admire, but I admire anyone who has managed to publish a book, be-it the traditional route or self-published.
  7. If you were to start your own book club, what authors would you invite to join?
    All of the above names plus Khaled Hosseini, David Walliams, Billy Connolly, and recently passed away, but I would have wanted her there, the late, but great Nora Ephron.
  8. What’s your favourite book of all time?
    AArgh! I dread this question! I really don’t have one favourite, but a few. I loved “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak and “One Day” by David Nicholls, but if really pushed a favourite would be, “After You’d Gone” by Maggie O’Farrell.
  9. What area do you suggest a budding writer should concentrate on to further their abilities?
    Write – write as if you’re exercising a writing muscle. It needs to be stretched and tended to as often as possible. I really believe someone has to try and write every day – even if it’s only a few words. They’re words that didn’t exist in that form and pattern before and they’re your words… If time is limited, try writing flash fiction; a great way to learn how less is more and how even with say a fifty word limit, you can have the beginning, middle and end of a story. And read, read in the genre you want to be published in to help place your writing and read outside of genre just because you can!
  10. If you were stranded on a desert island, which 3 books would you bring with you to pass the time?
    Is there one called “How to survive being stranded on a desert island” and would this stranding have left me at least with my reading glasses?! I would be so bad stranded on a desert island that I don’t think I’d survive long enough to read three books. Seriously, no amount of watching Bear Grylls over the years has helped. I think my bones would be found in a locked rocking position in the corner of a cave, my thumb planted firmly in my mouth.
  11. When sitting down to write, what is the one item you need beside you?
    A notebook and pen because although I write into a keyboard, I need one beside me either to read from notes I’ve made, or make some as I go along. (And a diet coke. Yes, sorry, that’s three things)
  12. And finally, do you have any projects or releases on the horizon that you would like to share with the readers of the website?
    I’m currently writing my second novel which has a working title of ‘It’s Who We Are’. Again I have two characters; female, Jess Powers and Theo Pope whose friendship is threatened when Jess suffers a personal tragedy and at the same time Theo’s marriage is disintegrating. It’s a story of friendship and love in all its guises of loss, grief and hope.

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